Visual attention drawn to meaning, not what stands out

Our visual attention is drawn to parts of a scene that have meaning, rather than to those that are salient or "stick out," according to new research from the Center for Mind and Brain at the University of California, Davis. The findings, published Sept. 25 in the journal Nature Human Behavior, overturn the widely-held model of visual attention.

"A lot of people will have to rethink things," said Professor John Henderson, who led the research. "The saliency hypothesis really is the dominant view."

Our eyes perceive a wide field of view in front of us, but we only focus our attention on a small part of this field. How do we decide where to direct our attention, without thinking about it?

The dominant theory in attention studies is "visual salience," Henderson said. Salience means things that "stick out" from the background, like colorful berries on a background of leaves or a brightly lit object in a room.

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