Are you a Prepper if you store food, or Just Plain SENSIBLE?

(We say you are just full of Common Sense!)

Do you have Auto Insurance? Of course you do. Health insurance? Most people do. What about Food Insurance? “Food Insurance”? you ask. Yes! Food Insurance! And if not, why not??

Most people have, at most, 1-3 days of food in their cupboards/fridge because they stop off at the grocery store several times a week. But now, no matter where you live in the US, you have most likely seen wicked bad hurricanes wipe out roadways, homes, businesses and the ability for those grocery stores to re-open or get re-supplied for weeks. You’ve seen Snowmageddon in many places across the country. And flooding, more flooding in more places than I can remember seeing. And extended power outages. And grocery store shelves empty of everything except the occasional jar of mustard or tin of anchovies (yum!)

So maybe you can see the sensibility of having a few extra cans of soup, and jars of peanut butter. But what about food shortages that are non-nature related. Do you follow world economics? The Euro, the Yen, the not-so-almighty Dollar? The relations between China and the US? The US and the Middle East? The US and terrorist factions around the world? Did you see the rioting in Venezuela caused by hyperinflation making what little food was available be unaffordable for the common person? Or non-existent? Think hyperinflation can’t happen here in the good ol’ US of A?

Many people, if their own house/home hasn’t been directly hit with a tornado, flood, hurricane, mudslide, snowstorm, CME or EMP have a tendency to think that “there’s nothing going on that would indicate the need for food storage. MY grocery store always has food.” They have a tendency to think that “nothing has happened to ME so it really isn’t anything to be concerned about”.

Talk about having a “grasshopper” mentality rather than the mentality of the wise ant who stores food all summer so they have plenty in winter. It sometimes makes me wonder. Yes, we have been systematically programmed OUT of having food on hand by the media, grocery stores, by commercials, by advertising companies helping to sell more quick and easy prepared foods. You don’t need to store any food, just go to Arbie’s Roast Beef for a quick sandwich.

But no self-respecting household in the 1930’s and 1940’s (even during most of the 1950’s) would have been without their canned vegetables from their own gardens, canned fruits from their own trees and bushes, root vegetables in the cellar and dried grains and beans, salt and sugar in the cupboard. It was in the 1950’s when “they” started training us to only have enough food for 2 days in the house. It was in the 50’s when we got loaves of Wonder Bread in the convenient square loaf so all the sandwiches could look the same, when we got Mac and Cheese in a box, and instant potatoes. Fast and easy – and we bought it up.

Then there are people who DID store food, but when the world didn’t end in 2012 (reference the Mayan Calendar non-event), decided storing food was stupid and they sold all their food. Boy, will that come back and bite them in the butt one of these days. I wonder if they also cancelled their car insurance, health insurance and Homeowners Insurance as well, or if they just got rid of their “Food Insurance”.

Back to Food Insurance. It seems to me if we weigh the cost of storing some basic grains, beans, dehydrated veggies, salt and sugar vs the outcome if we really need the food and don’t have it, it makes good common sense to store some food. Then the question becomes, how much should we store? My question to you is “Do you want to be able to feed yourself for 2 weeks, 2 months or 2 years if you couldn’t run down to Albertsons, Safeway or the Piggly Wiggly grocery store to restock your fridge/cupboards every few days?”

Coming up next week: Just What IS the Big Deal About Mylar Bags and Oxygen Absorbers Anyway?

By Teri Simpson
Optimum Preparedness
www.OptimumPreparedness.com
OptimumPreparedness.blogspot.com/

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